Best Bets for Independent Classic and Foreign Films:


Museum of Fine Arts


Coolidge Corner Theatre
3 screens


Kendall Theatre
Kendall Square
9 screens

Brattle Theatre
Harvard Square


Embassy Theatre
6 screens


West Newton Cinema
6 screens


‘Black Mass’   T he story of Whitey Bulger — a notorious Boston crime boss and longtime FBI informant — gets the standard gangster-movie treatment, with a few pungent performances (Johnny Depp as Bulger; Jesse Plemons as one of his henchmen) and a lot of dropped Rs. (Scott)

‘Bridge of Spies’   In this gravely moody, perfectly directed thriller about a real 1962 spy swap, Steven Spielberg returns you to the good old bad days of the Cold War and its fictions, with their bottomless political chasms and moral gray areas. Tom Hanks leads a terrific cast that includes Mark Rylance as a Soviet mole and Scott Shepherd as a C.I.A. operative. (Dargis)

Crimson Peak’(   From Guillermo del Toro, modern cinema’s No. 1 genre geek, comes a lush and macabre gothic romance, with a few ghosts thrown in for extra scares. Mia Wasikowska plays Edith, an early-20th century heiress from Buffalo who marries a British aristocrat (Tom Hiddleston) and moves to the spooky mansion he shares with his sister (Jessica Chastain). The mood of sinister, brooding eroticism is broken by Mr. del Toro’s compulsive exuberance. He throws in too many special effects and technic

The Walk 

The Walk (2015/II) Movie Reviews

‘Grandma’ (R, 1:20) A small marvel. Lily Tomlin plays a cantankerous feminist poet whose pregnant granddaughter (Julia Garner) wants an abortion. Paul Weitz matt Damon stars in this film as he  wrote and directed this intimate, heartfelt and extremely funny comedy. With Marcia Gay Harden, Sam Elliott and Judy Greer. (Scott)

‘Learning to Drive (R, 1:29) This small, smart dual portrait of the deepening friendship between a New York book critic (Patricia Clarkson) and her Indian-American driving instructor (Ben Kingsley) belongs to a school of grown-up, low-drama two-handers that doesn’t condescend to characters from different cultures and backgrounds. (Holden)

‘Listen to Me Marlon’ (No rating, 1:40) For this intimate documentary, the British director Stevan Riley combines a bounty of visual material with snippets from the many personal audio recordings that Marlon Brando made during his lifetime. The movie brings you ear-whisperingly close to its subject, whose legacy was partly tarnished by an entertainment press that punishes those who refuse to play the game. (Dargis)

Capsule reviews by N.Y.Times